Hard-to-read writing and how YOU can avoid it.

I’m reading a new book by a fairly prolific writer, and I must say I’m losing confidence in this particular author.

The first 100+ pages were dedicated to introducing many characters who may or may not become important, and setting the scene.

That is just too much! Get to the point, already!

Just so you know, very few people will stick with a story that has too many characters (especially if they are all introduced at once), and too much vague scene-setting.

A publisher or agent will not read that far, hoping it will get better. They will chuck that onto the reject pile and move on to the next manuscript.

Do you want this to happen to you? No?

Well, then. Get some tension or something for the reader to wonder or worry about right away! There’s nothing worse than slogging through a story hoping it will grab your attention.

I hope that helps at least one person avoid this pitfall. I sure hope so.

ChristineGuest blogger

http://www.bespokewriterchristine.com

bespokewriterchristine@gmail.com

Stationery or stationary?

These can be confusing, so a quick way to remember is E for envelope. That way you will know that stationEry refers to things you’ll need to write and send letters – envelopes, paper, pens, stamps, etc.

The other one, stationary, means not moving.

Now, here’s an offer I’ve developed just for you.
For one week only, September 21-28, 2021, when you book editing or coaching you will receive 25% off the entire thing!

You write a lot of words, so you know that savings like this can add up quickly. Contact me to find out just how much you can save!!

You can book as much or as little as you like. Could you use a hand getting started or finished? Do you need someone to bounce ideas off? Are you looking for clarity on direction? Whatever you need, when you need it!

If you book a day or half a day, you still get the 25% off. Wow!

I know you have something that could benefit from a little expert help so why not book now and get this deal while it’s still good?

Thanks for reading.

ChristineGuest blogger

http://www.bespokewriterchristine.com

bespokewriterchristine@gmail.com

Progress

Received my upcoming book, The Smoke Eater, from a Beta Reader.

The Good News

Looks like I have a greenlight to proceed with additional edits. The comments weren’t as bad as I thought. Actually, I have a renewed sense of accomplishment with my project and I’m feeling confident that my readers are going to like ti.

Nearing the Finish Line

I hope to get my book to market sometime after Halloween. Stay tuned.

Remembering 9/11

9/11 has affected everyone in the world. The biggest impact it had on me was
insight into our world.

When I was working the UAE I showed up on site one day and was kindly welcomed
as a new employee. This was in 2005 and my first overseas job in Oil and Gas.
The HR lead, an older Arab gentlemen, (great guy too), profusely apologized to
me for five minutes on how horrible 9/11 was.

This made me really uncomfortable, but others over there shared the
sentiment. I went to the Middle East thinking that there might be a grudge between my race
and theirs. What I found was a sense that so many people who were foreign to me
wanted unity.

Check out this link here for an excellent post on the Killzone Blog today by
Steve Hooley.

https://killzoneblog.com

Imply or Infer?

While at work one day I overheard my boss on the phone asking “Is that what she’s inferring?” I knew she meant implying, but I didn’t want to embarrass her by correcting her.

So, in order to save you any potential embarrassment, here’s the difference:

To imply is to hint at something – “He implied that he had his doubts.” (Past tense: implied)

To infer is to make a conclusion – “From what was written, I was able to infer that it was more political than it seemed.” (Past tense: inferred)

An easy way to remember these is the speaker (or writer) implies; the listener (or reader) infers.

Try not to mix these up as that can really make the narrative stumble.

(Want more? Contact me as outlined below.)

ChristineGuest blogger

http://www.bespokewriterchristine.com

bespokewriterchristine@gmail.com